Victor Maddern

Character & Episode: Det. Sgt. Watts in A Sentimental Journey
Born: 16/03/1926, Seven Kings, Ilford, Essex, England
Died: 22/06/1993, Hackney, London, England

Leaving school at the age of 15, Victor Maddern joined the Merchant Navy, serving in the war from 1943. He was medically discharged from service in 1946, and went on to graduate from RADA. His first screen appearance was in the war film Morning Departure (1950) with John Mills. This started a long career as a versatile and reliable supporting actor, often in British films and on television, frequently playing army roles, tough villains or citizens.

Victor also made a name for himself on the stage and one of his first roles was as Sam Weller in The Trial of Mr Pickwick in 1952. His television work during the Fifties included Fabian of the Yard (1954), Carrington V.C. (1955), while film work highlights were as Sgt Craig in The Cockleshell Heroes (1955), Figg in the comedy Barnacle Bill (1957) and Knowles in I'm All Right Jack (1959). In 1960 he was a television regular in the comedy series Mess Mates alongside Archie Duncan and Sam Kydd. During the same year Victor made the first of his five Carry On Films when he starred in Carry On Constable (his others were ...Regardless (1961), ...Spying (1964), ...Cleo (1964) and ...Emmannuelle (1978) and he would additionally feature in three episodes of the Carry On Laughing television series in 1975). In 1963 he briefly went to America and made guest appearances in Bonanza and Perry Mason. In theatre that year he gained critical praise for his role as Helicon in a production of Caligula. In 1966 he appeared in The Avengers and a year later played a drunken soldier in the Morecambe and Wise film The Magnificent Two. In 1968 he appeared in Doctor Who and also guested in two 1967-68 episodes of The Saint. In the Seventies Victor continued to be busy, garnering praise for his stage role as the notorious Frank Harris in My Darling Mr Daisy (1970). in 1972 he played a chauffeur in Steptoe and Son and the following year appeared in an episode of The Adventures of Black Beauty. From 1971 until 1979 he appeared in Dick Emery's comedy television series on the BBC, while on stage he also twice had a stint in The Mousetrap the world’s longest running play.

During this period he also featured in television programmes including Steptoe and Son, The Adventures of Black Beauty and Dixon of Dock Green. During the making of Dixon, he got famously tongue-tied trying to say the line "It's down at Dock Green nick", delivering the line twice as "It's down at Dock Green dick", and this became a much repeated outtake in compilation programmes such as It'll Be Alright on the Night. Victor continued to act throughout the Eighties, making contributions to such programmes as Southern Television's Together (as cabbie Harry Klein, 1980), In Loving Memory (1982) and adventure drama C.A.B. (1988). His last screen work was a voiceover for Freddie as F.R.O. 7 (1992), an animated fantasy.

As well as being a successful actor, Victor ran a script printing business from 1991 and he also opened a public speaking school - he offered special rates to Conservative MPs and constituency workers. He was a tireless worker for charities and was a member of the Conservative Party. When he died in 1993 of a brain tumour, he left a widow and four daughters.

Marie Makino

Character & Episode: Old Lady in That's How Murder Snowballs
Born: 15/10/1890
Died: 1977, Hillingdon, London

A minor character actress who made her screen debut at fifty, in the 1941 film Inspector Hornleigh Goes to It. Nearly twenty years then elapsed before she first appeared on television, initially working under the name Marie Makine.

She did however proceed to make useful cameos in The Saint (1963), Steptoe and Son (1964) and Frankie Howerd (1966) and her last television appearance was in 1973 in the series A Picture of Katherine Mansfield.

Dolorez Mantez

Character & Episode: Happy Lee in My Late, Lamented Friend and Partner
Born: 1936, Liverpool, Merseyside, England (as Dolores B Mantey)
Died: 30/11/2012, Sydenham, London, England

An actress who was born to a Ghanaian father and an Irish mother. She was a semi-regular on television screens in the Sixties and is best remembered for her role as the purple-haired Lieutenant Nina Barry in 23 episodes of the sci-fi series UFO. Dolores originally started her adult career as a seamstress in a dress shop.

She began her theatrical life as a singer and went full time when she joined a group and appeared in cabaret on the club circuit. However in 1959, whilst Mantez was visiting her agent she by chance happened to meet an actor's agent who believed her exotic physical appearance was exactly what he was looking for in a film called Sapphire. Despite no acting experience Dolores landed the part of a student in this film and this led to a succession of guest roles in popular television episodes of series such as Shadow Squad, The Avengers and Danger Man. During the Sixties she appeared in a number of musicals which led her to appearing all over Europe. She would later appear with Peter Gilmore in The Onedin Line.

Shortly after this Dolores met businessman Robert Harding in a pub and retired from the acting profession shortly afterwards. They married in 1976 and the couple would have one son. She died after a short illness in 2012.

Anthony Marlowe

Character & Episode: Cranley in When the Spirit Moves You
Born: 12/10/1913, Holborn, London, England (as Thomas Fernando Perredita)
Died: 10/11/1975, Chelsea, London, England

Anthony Marlowe was a London born actor who had a successful Hollywood career. He joined the Oxford Repertory in 1934 after being at RADA, acting initially under the name Fernando Perredita. During 1934-35 he was with the Jevon Brandon-Thomas company at Glasgow and Edinburgh; he went on to Sheffield Repertory and made his London debut in 1937 at the Mercury as the Electrician in Theatre Street. After more repertory, he had a season at the Bolton's and first appeared in the West End as Mr Thorpe in The Hidden Years at the Fortune. A gifted and impressive player, among the parts in which he was particularly noted were Randall Utterwood in Heartbreak House at the Arts, the General in The Moment of Truth at the Adelphi and the Rev Oliver Prefoy in Sailor, Beware! at the Strand.

In 1938, he made his screen debut in The Great Waltz, following it up a year later with a role in The Great Commandment. He began to focus on film after appearing in the Ted Lewis musical Is Everybody Happy? (1943).

Later in his career, Marlowe acted in the British film comedy Doctor in the House (1955) with Dirk Bogarde. In the same year, he starred as Mr Milligan in the short-lived drama Rex Milligan, appearing in three episodes.

In 1963 Anthony was cast as Geoffrey Stock, a recurring character in the crime drama series Ghost Squad. However, though continuing to make notable appearances in such productions as United! (1966), The Revenue Men (1967) and ITV Playhouse (1968), he was never able to match his high profile Ghost Squad role, and his appearance in Randall and Hopkirk would prove to be his last. He died a few years later, aged only 62.

Lois Maxwell

Character & Episode: Kim Wentworth in For the Girl Who Has Everything
Born: 14/02/1927, Kitchener, Ontario, Canada (as Lois Ruth Hooker)
Died: 29/09/2007, Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia

Canadian born Lois grew up in in Toronto, attending Lawrence Park Collegiate Institute. After leaving school, her first proper job was as a waitress at Canada's summer resort, Bigwin Inn, on Bigwin Island in the Lake of Bays, Ontario. However, at the age of 15, she ran away and joined the Canadian Women's Army Corps during World War II, a unit formed to release men for combat duties. CWAC personnel were secretaries, vehicle drivers and mechanics, and performed all conceivable non-combat duties. It was whilst in the army she went into entertainment, quickly becoming part of the Army Show in Canada. Later, as part of the Canadian Auxiliary Services Entertainment Unit, she was posted to the United Kingdom, to perform music and dance numbers to entertain the troops, often appearing with Canadian comedians Wayne and Shuster.

Lois left the army whilst still in London and then enrolled at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, where she became friends with fellow student Roger Moore. By the age of twenty she travelled to Hollywood, where began appearing in films. She soon won the 'New Star Of The Year - Actress' Golden Globe Award for her role in the Shirley Temple comedy That Hagen Girl (1947). In 1949 she participated in a Life Magazine photo layout in which she posed with another up-and-coming actress named Marilyn Monroe. It was at this time that she changed her surname to Maxwell, a name she borrowed from a ballet dancer friend. The rest of her family also adopted the surname. Despite this initial success, Lois struggled to forge a career in Hollywood and moved to Italy in 1950. She lived there for five years, made a number of films, even became an amateur racing driver, and played a leading role in 1953 in the opera Aida, in which she lip-synched to another woman's singing. Alongside her was a pre-stardom Sophia Loren, who was also performing to another person's singing.

On a trip to Paris she met Peter Churchill-Marriott and the couple married in 1957, and they settled in London. Peter nearly died of a heart attack early in their marriage and for most of their time together Lois was the main breadwinner. They would have two children and remained married until Peter's death in 1973. Whilst in England at the end of the Fifities, Lois appeared mainly in television in a number of series, most notably Danger Man and No Hiding Place. However, it was the role of Miss Moneypenny, which she had lobbied for at a time when the family was short of money, that would transform Lois' career in 1962. Director Terence Young, who had once turned her down on the grounds that she looked like she "smelled of soap", offered her a choice of Moneypenny or the recurring Bond girlfriend, Sylvia Trench, but she was uncomfortable with a revealing scene for the latter that she read in the screenplay. The role as M's secretary guaranteed just two days' work at ₤100 a day; Maxwell supplied her own clothes. The Trench character, however, was eliminated after From Russia With Love (1963), so she had made the right choice since she would go on to to star in fourteen films as Moneypenny, the last being A View to A Kill in 1985. By this time, she had been reunited with her old RADA classmate Roger Moore, with whom she had also previously appeared in episodes of The Saint and The Persuaders!

Although noted for her Bond role, Lois was busy throughout her run as Moneypenny, appearing in a wide range of parts. For instance, in 1964 she was working as a voice artiste on the Gerry Anderson Supermarionation series Stingray, to which she supplied the voice of Lt Atlanta Shore. Among her other well-known cult television turns were roles in series such as The Baron, Department S and UFO.

When Lois' husband died in 1973 she returned to Canada, and as a result her career slowed considerably. In Canada, she wrote a column for the Toronto Sun newspaper and became a businesswoman working in the textile industry. In 1994, she returned to England once more in order to be near her daughter, and retired to a cottage in Frome, Somerset. In 2001 she had surgery for bowel cancer and moved to Perth, Australia, to live with her son's family. She remained there, working on her autobiography, until her death at Fremantle Hospital six years later.

Paul Maxwell

Character & Episode: Alan Corder in The Trouble with Women
Born: 12/11/1921, Winnipeg, Mantoba, Canada
Died: 19/12/1991, London, England

Canadian born Paul served in the Royal Canadian Artillery in Europe during the Second World War. Having originally trained as a medical student, Paul graduated from Yale University with a Master's Degree in Fine Arts. Whilst in England, he met and married Scottish actress Mary Lindsay; the couple would have a daughter, Lindsay. Paul then moved back to America and began acting, making his television debut in General Electric Theatre in 1957. The series was presented by the future American President Ronald Reagan.

By the early Sixties, Paul moved to Britain where he was much more in demand. He would make more than one hundred television and film appearances during his career. His American accent was an asset to many productions made in Britain, a most notable instance being his casting as Elsie Tanner's ex-GI bridegroom at her wedding in 1967 on the long-running and popular soap-opera Coronation Street. Paul is also known for his voiceover role as Captain Grey in the first twelve episodes of Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons. He also played the "man with the Panama Hat" in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989) and General Maxwell Taylor in A Bridge Too Far (1977).

Paul also enjoyed theatre and appeared in the West End several times, including in Twelve Angry Men, and the musical Promises Promises. Other notable appearances for Paul came in UFO, Emmerdale Farm and Aliens. His last appearance was in The Sleepers in 1991. Paul by now was suffering from cancer and died in December of the same year.

Neil McCallum

Character & Episode: Rev. Henry Crackan in It's Supposed to be Thicker Than Water
Born: 20/05/1929, Henley, Saskatchewan, Canada
Died: 26/04/1976, Reading, Berkshire, England

Canadian by birth, one of Neil's first jobs was as a recreational therapist in a mental hospital; he later claimed that he learned more about acting in this role than he would ever have learned elsewhere. In 1949 he came to England and studied at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. His first major appearance on stage was with Sam Wanamaker in The Rainmaker in the mid-1950s. By the early Sixties, Neil started to build up a good television and film career. On TV he appeared in Department S, The Saint and UFO. He also worked as a voice artiste in Thunderbirds Are Go (1966) and Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1968), both for Gerry Anderson. His last appearance was in The Protectors in 1973, coincidentally another Anderson production.

Over the course of his career Neil notched up over sixty film and television credits, but it is generally thought he underachieved and did not receive the recognition that his talent warranted.

In his private life, at one time early in her career he dated the film star Julie Andrews. Sadly, Neil died much too young, at the age of 45 from a cerebral haemorrhage. His grandson Giles McCullum is also an actor.

Jane Merrow

Character & Episode: Sandra Joyce in Who Killed Cock Robin?
Born: 26/08/1941, Hertfordshire, England (as Jane Meirowsky)

A striking and talented actress, who remains active and has her own website and Facebook presence. The daughter of an English mother and German refugee father, Jane first acted at the age of eight. After attending RADA, she began her professional career in 1960 gaining work as an assistant stage manager. Her first screen role (albeit uncredited) followed in 1961, in the comedy film Don't Bother to Knock. Other early credits include The Plane Makers and Lorna Doone, both on television. During the Sixties, she appeared in a number of well-remembered television series, most notably The Avengers, The Saint, Danger Man, The Baron, Man in a Suitcase, The Prisoner and the long thought lost but recently recovered 1965 BBC adaptation of Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four.

In 1967, Jane was seriously considered as the replacement for Diana Rigg in The Avengers; she narrowly lost out to Linda Thorson (then a total unknown). In 1968, Jane was nominated for a Golden Globe award for her performance as Alais, the mistress of Henry II, in the costume drama The Lion in Winter. In the Seventies, Jane enjoyed a spell in America, appearing in several shows including Mission: Impossible, Alias Smith and Jones, Mannix, Cannon and The Six Million Dollar Man.

After several years in America, Jane returned to England to successfully run the family business. More recently, she has penned and produced a number of video shorts and has attended several conventions. Jane was once engaged to actor David Hemmings and has been married once. She currently splits her time between homes in London, France and America.

Kieron Moore

Characters & Episodes: Miklos Corri in When the Spirit Moves You
Born: 05/10/1924, Skibbereen, County Cork, Ireland (as Ciaran O’Hanrahan)
Died: 15/07/2007, France

Irish born Kieron Moore was brought up in an Irish-speaking household and his father was a political activist. Later, Keiron studied medicine at the University College in Dublin, though this was cut short when he joined the Abbey Players. Soon after, he married English actress Barbara White (1923-); the couple would remain together until Kieron’s death and have four children.

An early film role in 1948 was in Anna Karenina, when he played opposite Vivien Leigh, though the notices for his performance were poor. Despite this setback, Kieron was invited to Hollywood, where in 1951 he made two films, playing Uriah the Hittite in the biblical epic David and Bathsheba and a Foreign Legion officer in Ten Tall Men, starring Burt Lancaster. He also featured in Mantrap (1953), Recoil (1953), and The Blue Peter (1954).

In 1959, Kieron appeared in Darby O'Gill and the Little People. The following year, he gave an impressive performance in the comedy-thriller The League of Gentlemen (1960), playing a homosexual former fascist and army officer recruited to take part in a big robbery. He followed this with roles in The Siege of Sidney Street (1960), shot on location in Ireland, Doctor Blood's Coffin (1961), The Thin Red Line (1964), and Arabesque (1966). On television, he made notable appearances in Fabian of Scotland Yard, Jason King, The Protectors and The Adventurer.

Kieron quit acting in 1974, becoming a social activist on behalf of the Third World. He joined CAFOD (Catholic Agency for Overseas Development), with which he worked for nine years. During that time he made two film documentaries, Progress of Peoples (Peru) and The Parched Earth (Senegal). Later, as projects manager, he travelled to the Middle East and India. He next became associate editor of The Universe, editing the supplement, New Creation, which he transformed into the magazine New Day.

Kieron retired in 1994 to the Charente-Maritime in France, where he joined the church choir, became a hospital visitor, and enjoyed reading French, Spanish, English and Irish literature.

Garfield Morgan

Characters & Episodes: Edwards in You Can Always Find a Fall Guy;
Carlson in The House on Haunted Hill
Born: 19/04/1931, Birmingham, West Midlands, England (as Thomas Timothy Garfield Morgan)
Died: 05/12/2009, London, England

Upon leaving school, Garfield was initially an apprentice dental technician before going to drama school in Erdington, Birmingham. He started in repertory theatre at the Arena Theatre in the city in the mid-Fifties and would during the Seventies produce and direct theatre as Associate Director of the Nottingham Playhouse.

He made his television debut in 1956 in an uncredited role in The Intimate Stranger. He would go on to appear in well over one hundred productions, mainly limited to television. He started in minor roles but, as the Sixties progressed, he gained better ones and became a familiar face on British television. During the Sixties, Garfield notably worked on Coronation Street, Ghost Squad, The Saint and in 1966 he was for a while a regular cast member of the BBC's Softly, Softly, a spin-off series of Z Cars. He was often cast as policemen and in 1975 he won his most famous role, as DCI Frank Haskins in the popular crime series The Sweeney which also starred John Thaw and Dennis Waterman.

Garfield continued to be busy well into the Eighties, featuring in hit series such as Shelley, Boon and The Gentle Touch. As the Nineties approached, his career slowed and in later life he battled with cancer. The disease would later claim him in 2009, only months after his wife had also passed away. His last role was in the film 28 Weeks Later in 2007. Like Frank Maher, another Randall and Hopkirk contributor (see Extras), he was once married to actress Dilys Laye (194-2009). Garfield had a number of hobbies which included golf, photography and riding (show-jumping and eventing). A lesser known fact is that he also provided narration on four of Rick Wakeman's albums.

Section compiled by Darren Senior

Additional research and presentation by Alan Hayes

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