Until recently it was thought that only one featured vehicle from Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) survived today - the Hopkirks' red 1964 Austin 7/Mini, registration BAP 245B, which remains taxed and on the road at the time of writing (June 2019).

 

Previously this car had been owned by a fan of Randall and Hopkirk, John Kelly, but following his sad death several years ago, its exact whereabouts have been unknown.

 

However, it has recently come to light that another Randall and Hopkirk vehicle has also made it into the 21st century the 1963 Triumph Tiger Cub T20, registration FTC96B.

 

This motorcycle was seen in the third Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) episode produced, For the Girl Who Has Everything, in which it was driven by ghost hunter James McAllister.

 

The role was played by the popular character actor Freddie Jones, though for the St. John's Wood filming in which FTC96B appeared a stunt double was employed to ride it.

 

The T20 Tiger Cub - A Little Background...

 

The first T20 Tiger Cub (1954-1956) was derived from the 150 cc Triumph T15 Terrier (1953-1956) with the same frame and forks. This earlier version of the Cub used the Terrier's plunger rear suspension frame, but from 1957 this was updated to a more-modern pattern of rear swinging-arm with twin suspension units. The ignition points were positioned in a 'distributor'-type device on the crankcase behind the cylinder. A later development in 1963 was to site the points at a more conventional location on the end of the camshaft, accessed via a chrome cover below the base of the cylinder. The last model made was the T20 Super Cub, which, for economy of production cost, used a basic frame and other parts common to the BSA Bantam D10 including larger diameter wheels with full-width hubs. Launched in November 1966, it was discontinued in 1968, being briefly replaced by the 250cc TR25W 'Trophy', based on BSA's B25 'Starfire'.

 

Eagle-eyed viewers will probably have picked up on the fact that Jones rides two Tiger Cub T20s in the episode, identical models but with different registration plates, no doubt due to the same bike not being available for both filming dates:
 

1963 Triumph Tiger Cub T20
Registration FTC96B
Driven by James McAllister
Seen during the sequence filmed in St John's Wood High Street (outside Jeff's apartment)
1963 Triumph Tiger Cub T20
Registration HYV528C
Driven by James McAllister
Seen during the sequence filmed in Denham village (outside The Buttery tea rooms)
 

The bike seen at The Buttery, registration HYV528C,  is no longer registered at the DVLA and is presumed scrapped.
 

The other, which featured in the St. John's Wood filming session, FTC96B, was purchased by motorcycle enthusiast Bruce Honey in the 1980s, at which point it was not roadworthy - indeed, Bruce recalls that it was in pieces and the purchase was originally with a view to using the bike for spare parts for another Tiger Cub that he planned to restore. However, Bruce soon realised that it was in good enough condition to restore as a working machine.
 

FTC96B as purchased, complete with rear registration plate

 

The front and rear number plates were present on the bike at the time of purchase. Motorcycles carry a Vehicle Identication Number (VIN) just like cars do, and the chassis number present was indeed registered to FTC96B. Bruce believes that the front registration plate is actually the original one seen in the episode; he removed it and stored it away. The bike's rear plate was in poor condition and is now displayed on the wall of Bruce's workshop.
 

Bruce's Tiger Cub FTC96B prior to restoration.

 

But how did Bruce make the link between the bike he had and its Randall and Hopkirk heritage? Bruce explains: "I have always been a fan of Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased). We were watching episode three, and when the Cub stopped outside Jeff's, I said to my wife, 'Im sure I have that bike!'"
 

In recent years, he has restored it as close as possible to its original condition, a process which took two years from start to finish. Fortunately, spare parts for this model are relatively easy to obtain, meaning that the repairs are authentic and sympathetic.
 

The Randall and Hopkirk Tiger Cub was displayed for the first time at The Stoke Row Rally, a vintage steam and motor show on Saturday and Sunday 8th/9th June 2019. The bike is now fully working, though, as Bruce says that it still needs work, in part to improve the paintwork but also to remedy "the usual snags that come up with a bike that's been off the road for so long carb and ignition need fine tuning."
 

FTC96B on display at its first show, The Stoke Row Rally

 

It is almost certain that FTC96B appeared in series other than Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased).

 

If you've spotted any additional screen appearances of this motorcycle,
please drop us a line at
declassified.web@gmail.com and we'll list them here

 

Randall and Hopkirk (Declassified) is very grateful to Bruce Honey for contacting the site about his Tiger Cub, and for sharing photos and details with fans of Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased).

 

Feature by Alan Hayes  with thanks to Bruce Honey
Photos by
Bruce Honey
 

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